Exploration

Critical and Creative Thinking Across the Disciplines

Abolitionist Park

Fitchburg State Service Learners

Planning meeting with members of the Fitchburg State community 

"We are students at Fitchburg State University enrolled in the Honors Program.  As part of the program, we take a course entitled Honors 1020, Current Events and Service Learning. This page is the culmination of the Honors 1020 coursework taught by Dr. Danette Day in the Spring semester of 2021." 

"The Fitchburg Abolitionist Park celebrates the men and women of Fitchburg who fought for the abolition of slavery. It serves to educate anyone who visits the park about the Abolitionist Movement specifically within their own community of Fitchburg. This park will honor diversity, equality, freedom and be a space to bring people of all backgrounds together to celebrate these things."

Want to get involved? The project is seeking collegial collaborations to complete Phase 3 of the park. Phase 3 is the creation and installation of an interpretive display panel using AR to teach about the Abolitionist history in Fitchburg. Additionally, there is need for collegial support for ongoing program development (i.e. music, art, theater) in the park to engage community and to help sustain the park's livelihood.

Communication Law and Ethics Discussion Guides

Series of one-sheets created for the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA) of Worcester County chapter by students in the Communication Law and Ethics course and edited by Dr. J.J. Sylvia IV and Dr. Kyle Moody. 

Supported by SOPHIA and the Douglas & Isabelle Crocker Center for Civic Engagement 

"Gender and Sexuality: LGBTQ Issues and Themes"

Screenshot of the cover of Spring 2020 Falconer Literary Magazine

Undergraduate and graduate students in Dr. Wendy Keyser's LGBT Issues and Literature course submitted writing to Fitchburg State's The Falconer: A Literary Magazine of the English Graduate Program (PDF).

"The purpose of this issue is to share academic work on issues of gender, sexuality, and LGBTQ identity. Some readers may have begun to wonder 'what does it mean to be transgender?' and 'how is gender or sexuality non-binary?'. For these readers, the pieces in this volume are approachable enough to clarify answers to such questions, without use of jargon and with attention to the experiences of real people. Other readers may be deeply familiar with LGBTQ topics and seek deeper explorations of these topics, with interest in how academic thought applies these ideas to popular culture, literature, and researched aspects of society. These readers, too, will be rewarded by the depth to which the pieces in this volume explore new territory."

Supported by Fitchburg State University English Studies