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Students recognized at Kennedy Center festival

Posted 02/07/14

Fitchburg State students earned performance and technical awards and advanced to high levels of acting competitions at the recent Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival held in Hyannis.

Industrial Technology students Patrick Storey of Chelmsford and Nick Robinette of Boston were recognized for outstanding technical design and outstanding prop design and scenic dressing, respectively, for “Sacco & Vanzetti.” Storey was also selected as a Kennedy Center Festival intern.

Communications Media students also won recognition. Erik Nikander of Brookline, N.H., was named as first alternate in the Institute for Theatre Journalism and Advocacy Critics Award, while students McKegg Collins of Shrewsbury and Kimberlee Connor of Auburn were among 15 finalists from a field of 251 candidates for the national Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship. Kelly Quinn of Ronkonkoma, N.Y., and Matthew Rindini of Pembroke were among nine candidates selected from a field of 63 directors to present scenes for the national Stage Directors and Choreographers’ Showcase. David Muschetta of Boston was cast from a pool of 234 actors for “Geniuses” by Abbey Fenbert, which won the National Playwriting Program 10-minute Play Festival. Jonathan Savey of Merrimac was hired by the national Kennedy Center to serve as festival videographer for the week. Kelly Quinn of Ronkonkoma, N.Y., received the Award of Merit for Excellence in Actor Coaching for “The Laramie Project,” while Chris Maher of Littleton received the Award of Merit for Outstanding Silent Performance for “Arcadia.”

Kimberlee Connor of Auburn and recent graduate Kelly Stowell of Vandalia, Mo., each auditioned for and received multiple offers for graduate and professional actor training programs, spanning the U.S. and the United Kingdom.

The student-produced and created “LYLH,” written by and starring Fitchburg State student Thomas Karner of Hopkinton and directed by fellow student Matthew Rindini of Pembroke, was one of five student productions accepted into competition from a pool of 52. The production is still under review for recognition.

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