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Business/Marketing/Management Thesis Abstracts

Stephanie Brundige (Luis Rosero), 2014

How Title II Food Aid Compares to the World Food Programme: Ethiopia as a Case Study

This thesis analyzes the effectiveness of food aid received by Ethiopia with a focus on donations from Title II aid from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP). Ethiopia has faced famine and political issues for many decades and is one of the poorest countries in the world. At the same time, there is a large and growing amount of money going into Ethiopia from the United States in the form of Title II food aid, as well as aid from the World Food Programme, which necessitates an assessment of the effectiveness of this aid. By reviewing quantitative data from government organizations such as the Central Intelligence Agency, USAid, the World Food Programme, and qualitative data from the United Nations, this study assesses the effectiveness of food assistance by USAID and WFP. While a more comprehensive study would be necessary to establish causation, the data and literature reviewed here suggests that increasing food assistance has been associated with improving conditions in Ethiopia, including a decreasing malnutrition rate.

Steven Cole (Kwahng Kim), 2006

Offshore Outsourcing: Its Advantages, Disadvantages, and Effect on the American Economy

The United States has trained some of the world’s best computer programmers and technology experts. Despite all of this training, many businesses do not have a full understanding of information technology. As the importance of technology in the business world grows, many companies are wasting money on extensive technology projects. When problems arise, they expect that further investment will solve these issues. To prevent such problems, many companies have begun to outsource these functions in an effort to reduce costs and improve performance. The majority of these outsourced information technology and call center jobs are going to low-wage countries, such as India and China where English-speaking college graduates are being hired at substantially lower wages. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the positive and negative aspects of offshore outsourcing with a focus on the outsourcing markets in India and China, arguably the two most popular destinations for outsourcers. The cost savings associated with offshore outsourcing will be evaluated in relation to the security risks and other weakness of offshore outsourcing. In addition, an analysis of the number of jobs sent overseas versus the number of jobs created in the United States will be used to assess the effects that outsourcing is having on the American economy and job market. Finally, the value of jobs lost from the American economy will be compared to the value of jobs created. The goal of these analyses is to create a clear picture of this increasingly popular business strategy.

Gregory Duclos (George Mahoney), 2004

Barnes and Noble, Inc. Implements a Strategy with Focus on E-Commerce Development

Individuals are buying, selling, and investing in goods and services online at an increasing rate in Barnes and Noble, Inc. highly competitive market. Research tells us this trend will continue and B&N.com, a subsidiary of Barnes and Noble, Inc. will implement critical innovative components to their strategy for the goal of attaining a profit which will contribute to its growing success. B&N.com sells and accounts for their goods and services in the areas of marketing, human resources, customer service, financing, and the handling of inventory, and is developing these areas to succeed in their consumer retail markets. Interaction with primary and secondary stakeholders has been affected by online business and will continue with B&N.com's approach to serving their world wide stakeholders. The strategy that has been implemented to adapt to these changes and increase success in the fast growing technological environment is examined based on a broad review of literature in general business magazines, trade journals, newspapers, research journals, books, legitimate websites, and interactions with company representatives including a store manager, the manager of investor relations, and the director of corporate communications. Employing a case study, a brief history of Barnes and Noble, Inc. is developed, and the major events in the retail industry which led to the creation of B&N.com are analyzed. The development of B&N.com is discussed and future strategies and alternatives for the next 3 years are proposed to describe a plan for B&N.com to excel with the growing e-commerce element in their industry.

Nicole Lashua (Louis Zivic), 2004

New Source for Music

People have turned to the Internet as a method of obtaining music. The craze has stirred up much controversy both in the legal and social realms. The music industry believes that the sharing of music is against the copy write laws, yet people believe that it is their right to share music with others and music will be shared with or without the use of the Internet. Many articles have been written in order to convey the controversy and the legal issues that surround the issue, but this study takes a closer look at the company in the spotlight, Napster, and a new rival, i-Tunes. It continues on to examine how such services became available and the legal battles against Napster as well as individuals for using such methods of gathering music. Moreover, it answers the question of whether people are still using free download sites, the consequences of using such sites, and finally, whether Napster and i-Tunes have discovered a successful new business.

Louis Miola (Charles Wellens), 2004

Strategic Leveraging: A Look at Large Plan Services Implementation/Mergers and Acquisitions at Fidelity Investments

Fidelity Investments is regarded as the leader in the financial services industry. They have managed to do this by remaining one of the most technologically advanced companies around as well as being extremely innovative. Fidelity Investments deals in outsourcing, which means Fidelity manages other companies’ payroll, retirement plans, benefits, etc. so that the other companies do not need to form an independent department to handle these issues. When a larger company wishes to have Fidelity manage these issues it is handled by the Large Plan Services segment. This presentation examines the current problems that occur from the way information is currently distributed amongst the segment’s Project Managers and cliental. It will offer answers to the problems that currently slow the flow of information throughout the segment and help make the system more efficient.

Kerrianne Mullin (Louis Zivic), 2007

Examining the Relationship Between Awareness of Autism and Availability of Funding

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between awareness of autism in the general public and availability of funding for autism research. Researchers have found no source of autism in children and due to this they have also not been able to find a cure. Children are being diagnosed with autism at incredibly high rates; much higher than any other disability that afflicts children, yet it receives the least public and private funding of all of these same disabilities. There have been many steps taken recently by the government and by private institutions to increase awareness and the availability of funds for programs to help children with autism and also research to find the source and a cure for autism. This paper seeks to find the connection between awareness and availability of funding and also to identify steps that can be taken to increase both.

Amanda Rossi (Joseph McAloon), 2011

The Current Financial Crisis and Business Environment

The global financial crisis that began in 2007 is considered by many economists to be the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. During this global financial meltdown the world has witnessed disastrous stock market crashes, the implosion of multiple prestigious financial institutions, and government bailouts on an unprecedented scale. Surprisingly, it is difficult to receive a straightforward explanation from the financial sector or the government regarding the causes of this financial meltdown and the lack of foresight from both private and public entities. The view expressed in this paper is that both the private sector and the government are to blame for the magnitude of the financial crisis and for the lack of accountability in the steps taken in the aftermath of the global meltdown. To support this contention, this paper will draw upon interviews conducted with individuals in the banking and investment sector, primary sources dealing with the financial crisis, and the analysis of experts in the field. This paper will concentrate on assessing the root causes of the crisis, providing a summary of the key events, evaluating both the private financial sector and government’s role in the crisis, and analyzing the current business environment. The turbulence in the financial system has affected citizens in every income bracket and field of work and we all have a vested interest in understanding the causes and consequences of these pivotal events. George Santayana famously stated that “those who cannot remember their past are condemned to repeat it”, and it is the goal of this paper to ensure not only that we remember our past, but that we understand it.

Daniel Seaman (Louis Zivic), 2007

Staying On Top for the Future: A Hannaford Brothers Case Study

In the late 1800’s the Hannaford brothers, led by their sibling Arthur opened a small fresh produce market. From there the Hannaford brothers turned a small produce market into one of the most prominent grocery stores in the New England region. The grocery industry is by no means a non-competitive industry. With the emergence of companies like Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, Wal-Mart, and E-Commerce grocery, Hannaford needs a plan to stay on top of the grocery industry. Using research from websites, journals, and books, a case study was completed that contains a history of Hannaford Brothers and its major competitors, an analysis of their strengths, and finally recommendations of what Hannaford can do to stay on top. Hannaford has achieved a good position in the grocery industry as one in which customer service and high quality is a necessity. With their merger with Delhaize of America they have the financial backing of one of the largest food retailers in the United States. Hannaford has the unique opportunity to further develop themselves as one of the leaders in the industry while continuing to offer low prices, and venturing into new markets. Given all this Hannaford can remain among the top leaders in the grocery industry for the future.

Kimberly Waynelovich (Louis Zivic), 2006

Case Study: Ja'Duke Center for the Performing Arts

The goal of this project was to establish a one to three year expansion plan for the Ja’Duke Center for the Performing Arts (JCPA). JCPA is a family owned corporation established in 2004 and is currently looking for ways to expand their company. Using case study research and presentation methods, various recommendations can be made of how to go about the expansion. Case Study method begins by researching the history of the corporation, which then aids in developing pertinent facts about the business. Then S.W.O.T. analysis is performed which focuses on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the company. Finally, from the facts and S.W.O.T. analysis recommendations are made in order to solve the problem of how to successfully expand the company in a one to three year time span. This case study focuses on recommendations based on the Management by Objectives theory developed by Peter Drucker. This means that the recommendations are made based on specific goals rather than different areas of business. Some of the goals include: increasing enrollment at the center by 20% each year, designing and building a 8,000 square foot facility, increasing staffing by 2 part-time employees per year, diversifying revenue by adding programs, and finally finding affordable health insurance for owners and employees.